We talked to Olga about how her work relates to her identity and how she navigates her vibrant career. Here’s what she had to say:

How would you describe your creative practice?

I’m an artist and photographer. I live and work in Barcelona and New York, and my work explores the boundaries between fashion and documentary photography. In my images, these two languages merge to generate visual narratives that, through colors and shapes, maintain a close connection with social structures.

My source of inspiration is humanity in all its facets, from the everyday objects we use to the places where we live and interact. My work aims to blur the lines between the studio and real life. My work is also based on the study of colors and their direct connection with emotions. In my works, colors become objects and people become colors.

How do you train your creative muscle?

Dance naked in front of the mirror. Walk in nature. Run by the beach. Do yoga and meditation. Read. Laugh with my friends.

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

What does feminism mean to you?

Feminism should not be mentioned as a concept. We are all equal as units, and there are no nomenclatures.

Can you share any stories from your creative career when being a womxn was a focus, for better or worse?

It’s very natural for me to communicate with people on the set while shooting; as a womxn it is easy for me to create relationship ties with just a look or gesture. On the other hand, it was difficult for me at first to avoid some lewd glances and comments from assistants or photographers I worked with.

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

How does your identity as a womxn inform your work?

In my work, womxn have different shapes and colors that contribute to the global beauty of humanity. I accept those differences and work with models who aren’t from agencies exclusively, so I can bring the viewer closer to the reality of the world—not just what the media wants to show.

Can you talk about how working across cultures has informed your style?

A culture is made of colors, shapes, smells, words and stories. We are living and in a state of continuous culture creation. I’m inspired by creativity across the decades. As humans, we create our sense of style in order to say something about what we think and who we are—It’s an extension of our souls. When we portray people in art and media, and we show how they live, it’s like an open book to another reality and that brings humanity closer together.

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

How do you navigate anxiety about work?

Transmitting the values in which I believe, and giving light to and provoking emotions in others without receiving anything in return—only hope for the world. I try to believe in what I do with all my heart. I try to not look at what others are doing and compare myself to them, but admire them instead.

What do you want to be doing in five years?

Same but bigger, with bigger budgets. I would love to do furniture and sculpture. I also have the dream to help young creatives develop their creative capacities and believe in themselves.

What is one way that we can make work human?

Work with kindness and equality. No one is better or less than you; we are all unique.

What message do you have for womxn in the creative community?

Believe in what you do with all your heart.

Olga de la Iglesia

Photograph by Olga de la Iglesia

Olga's work is a prismacolor dream. She is a continuous source of inspiration and we hope to continue collaborating with her in the future. We're thrilled to launch this new online series and magazine by Ladies Who Create. We couldn't have done it without the creative power of this community.

If you enjoyed reading Olga's story and would like to learn about other creative womxn, request a personal copy of Feminist Propaganda.

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